Wednesday Question: How To Keep Track Of Where You Are In A Knitting Pattern.




All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by Jayne Stewart from Edinburgh.
 Question : How Do I Keep Track of Where I am in a Lace Pattern or Chart?





Answer: There are many different ways to keep track of where you are in a lace pattern or graphical knitting chart, but they mostly boil down to somehow blocking off the rows you aren’t working on or physically showing yourself which row you should be working on.

If you’re working with a pattern you’ve found online, print it out or write out the instructions. If you’re working from a book, it will be easier to keep track of your pattern if you make a photocopy. 
You can use a magnetized board (these can be found in the cross stitch section of craft stores) and use a long, straight magnet to “underline” the row you’re currently working on.
If you’re working from a chart and won’t have to work these instructions again, you can highlight each row as you knit it (or before you start) so you always know where you are.
A less fancy version that can also be done in a book is to use a Post-it note to show you which line or row you’re on. If you’re easily distracted, you can cover up both the rows or instructions above and below the row you’re working on so that you can only see the row you should be focused on.
Some knitters prefer to be able to see the rows they’ve worked before so they can ensure the row they’re working on is lining up with the previous knitting. Others like to see the part of the instructions or chart that they haven’t worked yet, to give them a better idea of where they’re going. Try both methods (as well as blocking off everything but the row you’re on) to see what works best for you.
Remember, too, that you need to be consistent about when you move your marker to the next row. Will you change as soon as you finish the previous row or wait until you’re actually starting the next row? This may not sound like a significant difference, but it is if you set your knitting aside for a day or two and can’t remember if you worked the row you’re seeing the instructions for or if you need to work that row.
If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

Daily Knitting Deals at Craftsy.com

Yeti Earflap Hat

  Be afraid of Yetis no more! This hat makes them downright adorable, the cold doesn’t stand a chance when it’s up against this “Yeti” hat, it will keep you toasty warm.


Size Newborn, (infant, child, adult)

You will need:
100 grmEyelash type yarn in white,
50 grm White double knitting type yarn
small amounts of black and blue double knitting type yarn.
At least 3 dpn and circular needle -I used 4mm but you need to use correct needle to obtain gauge.
Size 4.5mm & 3.5mm straight knitting needles for facial features.

Gauge : 19sts = 4 inches in stockinette stitch


Earflap Make 2.
With white eyelash yarn cast on 7sts.
Row 1 K1, purl to last st K1
Row 2 K1, knit front and back, knit to last 2sts, knit front and back, k1.
Repeat these 2 rows until 15sts.
Knit straight in st st a further until measures 2.75” (3”, 3.25” 4”).Break yarn.



Chart


HAT
With circular needle and eyelash yarn, cast on 10, (12, 14,16) sts, with right side facing, Knit across 15 sts of one earflap, turn, cast on 5 sts leaving eyelash yarn attached change to white double knitting and cast on 14,(17, 20, 25) sts, attach another ball eyelash yarn and cast on 5sts, turn, with right side facing, Knit across 15 sts of remaining earflap, turn, cast on 10, (12, 14, 16) sts; join to work in the round placing a stitch marker between first and last sts to mark beginning/end of rnds – 74,(81,88,97) sts.
Join, being careful not to twist stitches, place marker and begin knitting in the round. As you knit around this first row (keeping the double knitting section as set in the cast on row), you’ll notice four gaps, on either side of each ear flap. When you get to those, K2tog to close them up. At the end of the round, you should have 70 (77, 84, 93) stitches on the needles.
Continue next round working the eyelash and double knitting (face) sections as set but on this round start to work from chart in blue double knitting to represent the mouth. For newborn and infant sizes start on row 5 of the chart.
Work to end of chart.
Next in white only continue working eyelash yarn and double knitting sections straight untill
piece measures 3.5 (4.5, 5, 5.5) inches from the cast-on row.

Working only in eyelash yarn (knitting across double knit section with eyelash) begin the decreases as follows, switching to DPNs when the diameter of the hat is too small for your circular needle:
(Decrease) Row 1: *K8 (9, 10), K2tog*
Row 2: K all sts
(Decrease) row 3: *K7 (8, 9), K2tog*
Row 4: K all sts
(Decrease) row 5: *K6 (7, 8), K2tog*
Row 6: K all sts
Decrease in this manner until there are 35 sts on the needles.
Then decrease in the same manner, omitting the “k all sts” rows, until there are 7 sts remaining.
Pull yarn through the last 7 sts with a tapestry needle, pull through to inside and weave in end.


Horns.
With white double knitting yarn and 4.5mm needles cast on 15sts
Row 1 knit
Row 2 purl
Row 3 knit
Row 4 (k3,k2tog) three times
Row 5 knit
Row 6 purl
Row 7 (k2, k2tog) three times
Row 8 purl
Row 9 (k1, k2tog) three times
Row 10 k2tog three times, break yarn leaving long tail, thread through remaining 3 sts draw tight
to form a point secure and sew seam.

Eyes(make 2)
With black yarn and 4.5mm needles cast on 21 stitches loosely. Knit 3 rows. Pass all sts, 1 at a time, over first st. Cut yarn, leaving a long tail. Thread tail through remaining stitch; pull to tighten.

Inner Eye (make 2)
With white yarn and 4.5mm needles cast on 11 stitches loosely. Knit 3 rows. Pass all stitches 1 at a time over first as before.

Teeth(make 2)
With white yarn and 3.5mm needles cast on 6 sts.
Row 1 knit
Row 2 purl
Row 3 k2tog, k2, k2tog
Row 4 purl
Row 5 k2tog,k2tog
Row 6 purl
Row 7 k2tog, cut yarn leaving a long tail and thread through remaining stitch and secure.

Finishing
Using the photo as a guide sew eyes into position and make a french knot in the center using black yarn.
Sew teeth into positon on the blue of the mouth, attatch the horns and using black yarn embroider the nose.



Braids
Using white double knitting yarn, cut strands of yarn approx. 24 ( 24,36, 36) inches in length. ( at least 8 strands total)
Gather strands and find center.
Thread one end through center cast on stich of earflap , pulling even.
Separate strands into 3 equal sections and braid, making sure beginning is tight to earflap.
Secure ends with yarn or tiny pony tail elastic bands.
Trim ends even. Make pom pom using eyelash or double knitting yarn ad attach to ends of braids.




 Don’t go jumping out at any ramblers. Because they will think you are a yeti. Maybe. 😉





Daily Knitting Deals at Craftsy.com

A Good Day Was Had By All.

Yesterday (saturday) I went along with volunteers from the Humanitarian Relief Foundation to visit an orphanage in Kayseri, Turkey. The orphanage is home to 140 orphans aged between 3 and 14 yrs old, mainly from Turkey but some from Iraq.
 I took along with me hats, scarves, gloves, mittens, to help keep them warm in the winter months, Lily bears and other soft toys plus lots of sweeties,cakes and biscuits all donated by ‘Lily’s’ wonderful supporters.


The weather was warm and sunny so we were able to have fun outdoors. We went along to the Marina in Kayseri and had game of football and other sports, follwed by a picnic and entertainment by a magican.







 We had such a good time it was lovely to see the children enjoying themselves and hearing their laughter.

The Children loved their gifts.  A big big thank you for all your hard work! There will be lots more photos posted on our facebook page over the next couple of days.

Your help is really appreciated.

‘Lily’ is supported by businesses and individuals in Turkey,Uk, Austrailia, US and Germany whether it be donations of yarn, Knitting and Crocheting or transportation of completed blankets to receiving agencies.
‘Lily’ has no paid employees.  All the good work is done on a strictly volunteer basis.
‘Lily’ wishes to thank all those private individuals and businesses which support us.  Without you, there would be no ‘Lily’ – Love In the Language of Yarn.  We work hard for the day when we are no longer needed to help keep Children warm.

Dianne Jones – Founder of  ‘Lily’- Love In the Language of Yarn.



Basket Weave Moss Stitch



Every Saturday I will share with you a new stitch.
Today’s stitch is: Basket Weave Moss Stitch.



A beautiful basket weave stitch with a seed stitch twist. In this case seed stitch elements are added to the traditional basket weave stitch of stockinette and reverse stockinette. Ideal for throws and blankets either overall or border.
You need a stitch number multiple of 14 + 1 + 2 edge stitches. Repeat the pattern between the * as many times as you like.

Instructions

Rows 1, 3 & 5: edge st, * k5, p5, (k1, p1) x 2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, k1, edge st
Rows 2, 4 & 6: edge st, k1, * p1, k1, p1, k6, p5; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Row 7: edge st, knit across to last st, edge st
Row 8: edge st, purl across to last st, edge st
Rows 9, 11 & 13: edge st, * p5, (k1, p1) x 2, k5; repeat from * to last 2 sts, k1, edge st
Rows 10, 12 & 14: edge st, p1, * p4, (k1, p1) x 2, k6; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Row 15: edge st, knit across to last st, edge st
Row 16: edge st, purl across to last st, edge st
Rows 17, 19 & 21: edge st, * (k1, p1) x 2, k6, p4; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, edge st
Rows 18, 20 & 22: edge st, k1, * k4, p5, (k1, p1) x 2, k1; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Row 23: edge st, knit across to last st, edge st
Row 24: edge st, purl across to last st, edge st

Repeat rows 1 through 24.
Difficulty level: Easy

Warm Pink Mittens

Mittens are a form of  winter wear that keeps the hands warm and come in a variety of styles. Unlike gloves they are easier to knit because they lack defined fingers other than the thumb. Mittens are one of the easiest garments to create because you only need to use minimal shaping techniques. Knitting mittens is much like knitting socks, they’re quick, easy, inexpensive, and make an ideal gift.This pattern is suitable for novice knitters. Once you’ve got the hang of it, you can customize the fit and design to the suit the needs of your intended recipient.
This pattern size is Teens/ Adult
To knit these mittens you will need:

1 ball Chunky Type Yarn
Knitting Needles: Size 5 mm (U.S. 8) or whichever needles you require to produce the tension given below.


Tension: 18 sts and 24 rows = 4 ins [10 cm] in stocking st.

Instructions:
Left Mitt: **Cast on 34 sts.

Row 1: (RS). K2. *P2. K2. Rep from * to end of row.
Row 2: P2. *K2. P2. Rep from * to end of row.
Rep these 2 rows K2. P2 ribbing for 2 ins (6 cm) ending on a 2nd row.


Box Pattern:
Row 1: * k2, P2 rep from * to end
Row 2: as row 1
Row 3: * P2, K2  rep from* to end
Row 4: as row 3
These four rowws form box pattern

Work 4 rows box pattern**
Shape thumb: 1st row: work 15sts in pattern. (M1. K1) twice. pattern to end of row.

2nd and alt rows: pattern but Purl thumb stitches.       

3rd row: pattern 15 sts. M1. K3. M1. pattern to end of row.

5th row: patten 15 sts. M1. K5. M1. pattern to end of row.

7th row: pattern 15sts. M1. K7. M1. pattern to end of row.

9th row: pattern15. M1. K9. M1. pattern to end of row. 44 sts.

11th row: pattern27. Turn. Cast on 1 st. P13 (including cast on st). Turn. Cast on 1 st. K14.

 ***Beg with a purl row, work 9 rows in stocking st.

 Next row: (K2tog) 7 times. Break yarn. Thread end through rem sts. Draw up and fasten securely. Sew thumb seam. With RS of work facing, join yarn to last st on right hand needle. Pick up and knit 2 sts at base of thumb. pattern across sts on left hand needle. 34 sts.

Cont even until work from top of ribbing measures 6 ins [15 cm] ending with RS facing for next row.

Shape top: 1st row: K1. Sl1. K1. psso. pattern 11. K2tog. K2. Sl1. K1. psso. pattern 11. K2tog. K1.

2nd and alt rows: Pattern (no shaping)

3rd row: K1. Sl1. K1. psso. pattern 9. K2tog. K2. Sl1. K1. psso. pattern 9. K2tog. K1.

 Cont in this manner, having 2 sts less between dec every alt row to 18 sts. Cast off purlways. Sew top and side seam.***


Right Mitt: Work from ** to ** as given for Left Mitt.

Shape thumb: 1st row: pattern18. (M1. K1) twice. pattern to end of row.

2nd and alt rows: patter but Purl across thumb sts.

3rd row: pattern 18. M1. K3. M1. pattern to end of row.

5th row: pattern 18. M1. K5. M1. pattern to end of row.

7th row: pattern 18. M1. K7. M1. pattern to end of row.

9th row: pattern 18. M1. K9. M1. pattern to end of row. 44 sts.

 11th row: patern 30. Turn. Cast on 1 st. P13 (including cast on st). Turn. Cast on 1 st. pattern14. Work from *** to *** as given for Left Mitt.

Mittens are an excellent project for using up all those leftover yarn scraps you don’t need special supplies, not much yarn. Why not donate a set of mitts to a Christmas gift fayre. Or if you’re looking to do a good deed, try knitting mittens to donate to charities in the winter months and help keep someone warm.
If you would like to knit these mittens for charity please see :

‘Thoughtful Thursday’ Warm Winter Project
‘Knitting to Help Bridge and Beyond’
‘Knit with loving hands’
knit with love‘ earlier posts also on this blog. These charities and many more like them, need your help.


‘Thoughtful Thursday’ Warm Winter Project.

The number of children orphaned each day in the world is around 10,000. More than half of the orphans live in the streets where they face many threats and risks. Unfortunately, orphans are kidnapped every day in many parts of the world, they are abused by prostitution gangs, organ mafia, begging networks and missionary institutions. Every orphan who is taken care of means that we will have a brighter future.


A plea from ‘Lily’ Love In the Language of Yarn!

This weekend I will be visiting an orphanage in Kayseri, Turkey with a group of volunteers. The orphange is home to 140 children at the moment, I will be  taking with me a parcel for each child. I have been busy knitting a ‘Lily’ Bear for each child, our volunteers have been busy knitting and crocheting and have been wonderful and donated hats, scarves and gloves for each child in the orphanage.
At present there are 5,166 orphans in orphanages throughout Turkey.

Knitters and Crocheters I need your help with our Warm Winter Project!

 We need hats, scarves, gloves, socks, sweaters etc. for orphans and children of low income familes. Age groups are 0-3yrs,  3-6yrs, 7-10yrs and 12-14yrs. Boys and Girls. We have teamed up with several organisations who will also be providing shoes/boots, stationery materials, coal and wood for heating, blankets, stoves, electric heaters, foodstuffs and other winter necessities. To help orphans and impoverished children spend the winter happily and in health.

Can you help?

We will be distributing knitted and crochet items throughout the winter months.
For more information on ‘LILY’ to can find us on facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/LilyLoveInTheLanguageOfYarn over the next couple of weeks we wiil be adding patterns and information so please check in regularly and please ‘Like’ us so you will receive up dates.

Please Help If You Can!


Here’s a free knitting pattern from Patons to help get you started.


MATERIALS:
  • Patons® Astra (50 g/1.75 oz)
Boy’s Version (all sizes)
  • Main Color (MC):
    • (Blue) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast A: (Variegated) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast B: (Orange) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
Girl’s Version (all sizes)
  • Main Color (MC):
  • (Red) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast A: (Variegated) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast B: (Yellow) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
Knitting Needles:
  • Hat and Scarf: Size 4 mm (U.S. 6) knitting needles or size needed to obtain tension.
  • Mittens: Set of size 4 mm (U.S. 6) double pointed knitting needles or size needed to obtain tension.
SIZES:
  • Scarf: 6 x 46 ins [15 x 117 cm].
  • Hat: To fit child 2/4 yrs (6/10 yrs).
  • Mittens: To fit child 2/4 yrs (6/8 yrs – 10 yrs).
TENSION
22 sts and 28 rows = 4 ins [10 cm] in stocking st.
ABBREVIATIONS
Alt = Alternate.
Beg = Beginning.
Cont = Continue(ity).
Dec = Decrease.
Inc = Increase 1 stitch by knitting into front and back of next stitch.
K = Knit.
K2tog = Knit 2 stitches together.
M1 = make one st by picking up horizontal loop lying before next st and knitting into back of loop.
M1P = make one st by picking up horizontal loop lying before next st and purling into back of loop.
P = Purl.
Pat = Pattern.
Psso = Pass slipped stitch over.
Rep = Repeat.
Rem = Remaining.
Rnd(s) = Round(s).
RS = Right side.
Sl1 = Slip next stitch knitwise.
St(s) = Stitch(es).
Tog = Together.
WS = Wrong side.
INSTRUCTIONS
The instructions are written for smallest size. If changes are necessary for larger size(s) the instructions will be written thus ( ). Numbers for each size are shown in the same color throughout the pattern. When only one number is given in black, it applies to all sizes.

Stripe Pat
With MC work 4 rows.
With A work 4 rows.
With B work 2 rows.
With MC work 2 rows.
With A work 4 rows.
These 16 rows form Stripe Pat.
EARFLAP HAT
First Ear Flap
With MC and pair of needles, cast on 10 sts.
1st row: (RS). Knit.
2nd row: P1. M1P. Purl to last st. M1P. P1.
3rd row: K1. M1. Knit to last st. M1. K1.
Rep last 2 rows twice more, then 2nd row once. 24 sts.
Work 12 rows even in stocking st, ending with RS facing for next row. Break yarn. Leave sts on a spare needle.
Second Ear Flap
Work as given for First Ear Flap. Do not break yarn.
Body of Hat: (Joining row). With MC, cast on 8 (9) sts. Knit these 8 (9) sts. K24 across Second Ear Flap. Turn. Cast on 35 (39) sts. Turn. K24 across First Ear Flap. Turn. Cast on 8 (9) sts. 99 (105) sts.
Purl 1 row.
With A, proceed as follows:
1st row: (RS). Purl
2nd and 3rd rows: Knit.
4th row: Purl.
Last 4 rows form Texture Pat.
Beg with 9th row of Stripe Pat, cont in Stripe Pat and rep last 4 rows of Texture Pat 7 times more, dec 2 (0) sts evenly across last row. 97 (105) sts.
Shape top: Keeping cont of Stripe Pat, proceed as follows:
1st row: K1. *K2tog. K10 (11). Rep from * to end of row. 89 (97) sts.
2nd and alt rows: Purl.
3rd row: K1. *K2tog. K9 (10). Rep from * to end of row. 81 (89) sts.
5th row: K1. *K2tog. K8 (9). Rep from * to end of row. 73 (81) sts.
6th row: Purl.

Cont in same manner, dec 8 sts on next and every following alt row 5 (6) times more. 25 sts.
Next row: K1. *K2tog. Rep from * to end of row. 13 sts.
Break yarn leaving a long end. Draw end through rem sts and fasten securely. Sew back seam.

Braid: (make 3).
Cut A, 15 ins [38 cm] long. Take 12 strands tog, fold in half and knot into fringe at end of each earflap and at top of Hat as shown in picture. Braid each Fringe. Knot securely and trim ends evenly.
MITTENS

RIGHT MITTEN
**With MC and set of four knitting needles, cast on 28 (36-44) sts. Divide sts on 3 needles as follows: 12 (12-16) sts on 1st needle, 8 (12-16) sts on 2nd needle and 8 (12-12) sts on 3rd needle. Join in rnd. Place marker on first st.
Beg with 1st row of Stripe Pat.
Proceed as follows:
1st rnd: *K1. P1. Rep from * around. Rep last rnd of (K1. P1) ribbing for 11/2 (2-2) ins [4 (5-5) cm] and inc 4 sts evenly across last rnd. 32 (40-48) sts.
Keeping cont of Stripe Pat, knit 6 (8-10) rnds.**
Shape thumb gusset: Cont in Stripe Pat, proceed as follows:
1st rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in each of next 2 sts. Knit to end of rnd.
2nd and alt rnds: Knit.
3rd rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K2. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
5th rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K4. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
7th rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K6. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
9th rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K8. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd. 42 (50-58) sts.
11th rnd: K28 (32-36). Slip last 12 sts onto a safety pin (thumb opening). Knit to end of rnd.
12th rnd: Knit, casting on 2 sts over slipped sts. 32 (40-48) sts.
***Cont in Stripe Pat, knit in rnds until work from beg measures 6 (7-8) ins [15 (18-20.5) cm].
Rearrange sts as follows: 16 (20-24) sts on 1st needle. 8 (10-12) sts on 2nd needle. 8 (10-12) sts on 3rd needle.
Shape Top: 1st rnd: 1st needle: Sl1. K1. psso. Knit to last 2 sts. K2tog. 2nd needle: Sl1. K1. psso. Knit to end of needle. 3rd needle: Knit to last 2 sts. K2tog.
Dec 4 sts on every rnd, as before, until there are 8 sts. Break yarn, leaving a long end.
Thread end through rem 8 sts. Draw up and fasten securely.
Thumb: With MC, K12 from safety pin.
Pick up and knit 2 sts at base of thumb.
Divide these 14 sts onto 3 needles.
With MC, knit 9 (11-15) rnds.
Next rnd: (K2tog) 7 times.
Next rnd: (K2tog) 3 times. K1.
Break MC leaving a long end. Thread end through rem 4 sts. Draw up and fasten securely.***
LEFT MITTEN
Work from ** to ** as given for Right Mitten.
Shape thumb gusset: Cont in Stripe Pat, proceed as follows:
1st rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in each of next 2 sts. Knit to end of rnd.
2nd and alt rnds: Knit.
3rd rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K2. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
5th rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K4. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
7th rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K6. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
9th rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K8. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd. 42 (50-58) sts.
11th rnd: K26 (30-34) sts. Slip last 12 sts onto safety pin (thumb opening). Knit to end of rnd.
12th rnd: Knit, casting on 2 sts over slipped sts. 32 (40-48) sts.
Work from *** to *** as given for Right Mitten.
SCARF
With MC and pair of needles, cast on 33 sts.
1st row: (RS). Purl.
2nd and 3rd rows: Knit.
4th row: Purl.
Last 4 rows form Texture Pat.
First 4 rows of Stripe Pat are complete.
Keeping cont of Stripe Pat, rep last 4 rows of Texture Pat until work from beg measures 46 ins [117 cm], ending with RS facing for next row. Cast off knitwise.
Fringe: Cut A 10 ins [25.5 cm] long. Take 4 strands tog, fold in half and knot into fringe 3/4 inch [2 cm] apart across each end of scarf. Trim fringe evenly.
Colorful Winter Set Pattern

Wednesday Question: What Is Blocking?

All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by Ineka in Holland.
 Question : The pattern I am following at the moment says that when finished all pieces need to be blocked, what is meant by blocking and is it really necessary?





Answer: Blocking is a method of stretching and shaping a finished knitted piece to reach the dimensions suggested in the pattern, to make two pieces that need to match the same size, or to make your stitches look nicer and more even. Lace almost always needs to be blocked to “open up” the design so all those beautiful holes and patterns show in their true glory.


Before Blocking                                             After Blocking


There are three main methods of blocking: wet blocking, steam blocking and spray blocking.


Wet Blocking

Wet blocking knitting is an appropriate method for blocking man-made fibers, novelty yarns (except for some very delicate novelties that may fall apart when wet—check the label for care instructions and don’t wet anything that says it shouldn’t be wet) and some wools and wool blends if done carefully (remember heat and agitation can cause wool to felt).
Dampen the knitted piece so that it is wet but not dripping. Spread the piece out on a towel, sheet or clean garbage bag (the bag won’t absorb water, allowing the piece to dry faster) on the floor or a spare bed where it can sit undisturbed long enough to dry.
Gently stretch the piece as needed to meet your blocking goals. If you’re trying to get a piece to the size or shape the pattern recommended, you might need a ruler, tape measure or yard stick to help you out.



Use rust-proof safety pins, straight pins or T-pins to hold the knitted piece to the towel or sheet. As the piece dries, it will retain the shape that you gave it.



Steam Blocking

Steam blocking is a similar process to wet blocking, only you use steam to relax the fibers instead of water. This is the best process for fibers that shouldn’t get wet, as well as for cottons, which tend to completely lose their shape when wet. It shouldn’t be used on man-made fibers, because heat and steam tend to destroy them and make a mess of all your hard work.
Different knitters use different techniques when it comes to steam blocking. Some people stretch and pin their work to the desired shape before steaming, using the steam to help set the new shape. Others steam first and then pin, allowing the steam to relax the fibers and make it more pliable.
The method you use may depend largely on the flexibility of the knitting. If you can get it into shape without the steam, pin first. If not, steam and then pin.
The steaming method involves slightly dampening a clean sheet or other piece of fabric and placing it over the knitting. Use a hot iron to press very lightly on the sheet. Don’t press like you are actually ironing, you’re just pushing the steam through the sheet and into the knitting. Continue this process until the sheet is dry.

You can also steam block without a protective layer of fabric. Just set your iron on steam and wave the iron slowly over the knitting, being careful not to touch the work with the iron. Then pin if necessary and leave to dry.

Spray Blocking

Spray blocking is the most gentle blocking process and is great for expensive and delicate fibers like silk and cashmere. It’s a good method to use when you aren’t sure what kind of yarn you’re dealing with.
All you need to do is pin the piece to the desired dimensions and lightly spritz the finished piece with water from a spay bottle. Get it damp enough to relax the fibers, but not soaking wet. Allow to dry and you’re done.


Blocking Tools


There are tools especially made for blocking knitting, which you may or may not find useful. Blocking boards are made of heat-resistant materials and often have grids printed on them so you can easily measure your pieces. They can be pinned into and usually fold for storage.

T-pins are often recommended for use when blocking knitting. They are like regular straight pins except the head is shaped like a T. They a long and easy to work with, and also rust-proof so you don’t have to worry about leaving them in your knitting while it dries.


For blocking lace and other large projects, you can purchase blocking wires, which are flexible metal wires that can help you block curves or the sides of a large project. The wires can be woven in and out of the project and reinforced with straight pins if necessary.



When i first started knitting I ignored the instruction “block garment pieces before seaming” because I didn’t see the value or the point of it. It wasn’t until I had been knitting a while and wanted to even out my stockinette stitch that I learned how to block. That and, no matter what I did, even if the pieces measured so that the armhole fit, it always was uncomfortable, the fabric  pulling strangely because I have a bust. Blocking makes your life so much easier. You shape the pieces into the way you want them to live.  It makes your knitting more even and sets the stitches. And you can fix a lot of boo-boos that way. So the answer to the second part of the question is YES! it is necessary.

Blocking knitting does not have to be an ordeal and you should be happy to know that the time you spent on it will be rewarded when you have a much better-looking garment to enjoy.


If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog.