Knitted Childs Tuxedo

One for the boys! This Tuxedo is easy to knit and looks the part – perfect for that special occasion.

Sizes: 12 months (2 yrs, 3 yrs).
Materials: Worsted Weight Yarn: 100 grm black, and 50 grm white.
Knitting needles, sizes 4mm and 5mm.
seven white 5/8″ buttons, and two black 5/8″ buttons.
Gauge: 20 sts and 24 rows = 4 inchs in stockinette stitch on 5mm needles.
Back: With black yarn and size 4mm needles, cast on 46(52, 55) sts.
Work in k1, p1 ribbing for 12 rows.
Change to size 5mm needles, and inc 10 sts evenly across next row, knitting all sts (right side). Work even in stockinette stitch until piece measures 7(7 ½, 8 ½) inches from beg.
Shape Armhole: Cast off 4 sts at the beginning of next two rows.
Dec one st each side every right side row 3(4,5) times. 42(46, 47)sts remain.
Work even until piece measures 12 (13, 14) inches from beg.
Cast off.
Right Front: With black, and size 4mm needles, cast on 26(29, 31) sts.
Work in k1, p1,ribbing for 12 rows, increasing 5 sts evenly across last row.
Change to size 5mm needles.
With white, k 17, then knit 14(17,19) with black (right side).
Row 2: Purl across all black sts with black, then with white; (k3, p1) 3 times, end k5.
Row 3: With white, k5, (sl 1, p3) 3 times, then knit to end with black.
Repeat rows 2 and 3 for pattern. Work even until piece measures 7(7 ½, 8 ½) inches.
Armhole Shaping: Cast off 4 sts at armhole edge, then dec 1 st at armhole edge every right side row 3(4,5) times. Work even until piece measures 10 ½ (11 ½, 12 ½ ) inches.
Neck Shaping: Put 5 sts of button band on a stitch holder. Cast off 2 sts at neck edge on next right side row, then dec 1 st at neck edge on next two rows. Decrease 1 st every right side row 3 times 12(14, 15) sts rem. Cast off in respective colours.
Left Front: With black and size 4mm needles, cast on 26(29,31) sts.
Work in p1, k1 ribbing for 12 rows, making buttonholes on rows 5 and 9 of ribbing as follows: work to last 4 sts; yo, k2tog, rib 2. Increase 5 sts evenly across last row.
Change to size 5mm needles.
K14(17,19) with black, then knit 17 with white (right side).
Row 2: With white, k5, (p1, k3) 3 times; purl across all black sts.
Row 3: With black, knit all black sts; then with white, (p3, sl 1) 3 times, k5.
Repeat rows 2 and 3 for pattern, making first buttonhole in center of buttonhole band on row 5 of white, then every 10 rows. Decrease for armhole and neck same as right front, only reversing shapings. (Last buttonhole should end up just before buttonhole band sts are put on stitch holder).
Sleeves (make two): With size 4 needles and white, cast on 26 sts.
Work in k1, p1 rib for 4 rows. Change to larger needles and black. Starting stockinette stitch with a knit row, inc 8 sts across row (34 sts). Continue in st st , inc 1 st each side every 5(7,8) rows 7(8,9)
times. When sleeve measures 7(7 ½ ,8 ½ ) inches from beginning, start armhole shaping.
Armhole Shaping (follow respective size shaping):
Size 12 months: Castoff 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows, then 2 sts at beg of next 4 rows, then 1 st at beg of next 4 rows, 2 sts at beg of next 4 rows, then 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows. Cast off rem sts.
Size 2 yrs: Castoff 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows, then 2 sts at beg of next 4 rows, then 1 st at beg of next 4 rows, 2 sts at beg of next 2 rows, then 3 sts at beg of next 4 rows. Cast off rem sts.
Size 3 yrs: Castoff 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows, then 2 sts at beg of next 6 rows, work 2 rows even, then cast off 2 sts at beg of next 6 rows, then 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows. Cast off rem sts.
Finishing: Sew shoulder seams and side seams. Sew sleeve seams. Sew sleeves into
armholes.
Neckband: Pick up sts around neck as follows: With white, and size 4mm needles, work along sts of buttonband on right front (keeping band in garter stitch), pick up 12 sts along right neck edge, pick up 17(20,22) sts along back, 12 sts down left front, and along buttonhole band sts of left front (keeping this in garter st also). Work 5 sts garter st, p1, k1 rib to last 5 sts, then 5 sts garter st. Cast off loosely after 7 rows.

Bowtie: With size 4mm needles, and black, cast on 9 sts.
Row 1: (k1, p1) 4 times, k1.
Rows 2-4: repeat row 1.
Row 5: p2-tog, (k1, p1) twice, k1, p2-tog.
Row 6: (p1, k1) 3 times, p1.
Row 7: k2-tog, p1, k1, p1, k2-tog.
Rows 8-10: knit.
Row 11: k2, yo, k2-tog, k1.
Rows. 12-14: knit.
Row 15: knit then purl into first stitch, k1, p1, k1, purl then knit into last stitch.
Row 16: (k1, p1) three times, k1.
Row 17: purl then knit into first stitch, (p1, k1) twice, p1, knit then purl into last stitch.
Rows 18-21: (k1, p1) 4 times, k1.
Cast off.
Bowtie buttons onto top button of sweater.

 Now your little man can join the Gentlemans club!

Wednesday Question: What Is ‘Yarn Weight Classification?’


All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by Jenny Cambell in Scotland.
 Question : What is meant by “Yarn Weight Classifications?”





Answer: The “yarn weight classification” does not refer to how much a yarn “weighs” but is a standard designation for the size (diameter) of the yarn. The “yarn weight” required for a project and the amount of yarn needed to complete a project is specified in the project instructions. The thickness or thinness of a yarn is referred to as the yarn weight. Each weight has various names depending on what country you live in. Ply, in this case, does not refer to the number of strands that make up the yarn as it is spun together; rather, it is a term used in the UK and Australia to refer to how thick or thin the yarn is.

Here are terms used to refer to these weights of yarn in addition to the suggested gauge for each weight and the appropriate needle size.
Weight Sts Per 4″ (10 cm) Suggested Needles
Category 1
Superfine
Fingering
Baby
4 Ply
28-32 0-3 US
2-3.25mm
Category 2
Fine
Sportweight
5 Ply
24 3-6 US
3.25-4.25mm
Category 3
Light
DK
8 Ply
22 4-6 US
3.50-4.25mm
Category 4
Medium
Worsted
10 Ply
20 6-9 US
4.25-5.50mm
Heavy Worsted
Aran
12 Ply
16-18 8-10 US
5-6mm
Category 5
Bulky
Chunky
13 Ply
12-14 10-11 US
6-8mm
Category 6
Super Bulky
14 Ply
8-10 11-15 US
8-10mm

Most yarn manufacturers make it easy for you to determine the weight of a particular yarn. Many of the mass-produced yarns use the yarn standards ranking system and will have the number and weight printed right on the label.

Other manufacturers don’t make it as easy, but they should have a gauge statement that will say something like “24 stitches and 22 rows per four inches on size four needles.” If you know a little bit about yarn weights (which you will when you consult the chart ) you’ll know that the yarn in question is sport weight.

Have fun, and happy knitting!

If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 


Pink Wave Keyhole Scarf

Lock in the warmth with this new scarf style that is comfortable and easy to wear when temperatures take a dip. A keyhole scarf is basically a scarf with a hole in it. One end of the scarf is put through the hole to keep it in place around your neck without being bulky. This Pink Wave Keyhole Scarf is a quick and easy knit scarf pattern and makes a great gift as the colder weather approaches.     

You Will Need:
100grms Double knit type yarn in Main colour
50grms Double knit type yarn in Contrast colour
Size 4mm needles.

Scarf
First Half
Cast on 36st in Main clour
Row 1 Knit
Row 2 Purl
Row 3 Knit
Row 4 Purl
Row 5 K2tog, 3 times,(yo,K1) 6 times, K2tog 6 times, (yo, K1) 6 times, K2tog 3 times
Row 6 Knit
These 6 rows form the pattern
Change to contrast colour and work 6 rows of pattern
Change to main colour and work 6 rows of pattern
Change to contrast colour and work 6 rows of pattern
Change to main colour and work 6 rows of pattern
( 3 ‘waves’ in main colour and two in contrast)

Change to knit 2, Purl 2 Rib and work 8 rows.

Work Keyhole


Rib 18 sts place remaining 18 sts on holder.


Turn, working on these 18 sts only, continue in Rib

and work 22 rows, ending in middle of piece. Cut yarn and place sts on holder.

With right side facing, join yarn to 18 sts on holder. Rib for 22 rows, ending at side edge.

Turn, Rib18 sts, then Rib across 18 sts on holder.

Turn, Rib even until work measures 42 cm from the begining. Place stitches on holder.

Second Half

Cast on and work same as for first half of scarf, omitting keyhole.
Work even until piece measures same as first half.

FINISHING

Join with 3-Needle Bind off as follows:
Slip sts from first half onto knitting needle. With wrongsides facing, and points of both needles pointing to the right,
use spare needle to * knit the first st from the front
needle together with the first st from the back needle.
Knit the next st from each needle in the same manner, then bind off 1 st. Repeat from * until all sts have been bound off. Fasten off last st. Weave in yarn ends.

As this month is Breast Cancer Awareness Month I chose to knit this in pink and white. This scarf is a stylish way to show your support.
Enjoy Your knitting!

Wednesday Question: What Is A Swatch?

All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by Brenda Buckley.
 Question : My pattern says to knit a swatch before starting to knit the sweater is it necessary and what is it? 





Answer: YES YES YES!

The gauge swatch is basically just a square piece of knitted fabric that demonstrates how you, the needles and the yarn interact before you get going on the main project. All patterns give a recommended gauge, or stitches and rows per inch, at the beginning of their instructions, usually directly below the suggestions for yarn weight and needle size.



There are a number of ways to make a swatch. This is my prefered method. My flat-knit swatch consists of 4 rows of garter stitch, the stitch pattern called for, keeping the first and last 4 stitches in garter stitch, and then ending with 4 rows of garter stitch. The garter stitches will frame the area to be measured and eliminate any curling. See the table below for yarn weight and suggested minimum number of stitches to cast on and rows to work.
Yarn Weight Min. Number of Pattern Stitches Garter Stitches for edge borders Total Number for Cast On Min. Number of Rows incl. 4 rows garter at beg and end
Fingering 28 4+4 36 48
DK 24 4+4 32 44
Sport 20 4+4 28 40
Worsted 16 4+4 24 36
Bulky 12 4+4 20 32
Super Bulky 10 2+2 14 24

As you can see, the figures for the cast-on and the number of rows to knit are based roughly on what the yarn weight in question generally yields for a standard gauge and really represent the bare minimum numbers you will need for an accurate measurement. Remember, the bigger the swatch, the more accurate your gauge will be, so don’t hesitate to make it as large as you can. Of course, if you are working a flat swatch in a stitch pattern, you’ll want to make sure you include at least 3 patterns repeats AND any additional stitches included at the end of the row.

With a ruler (not a tape measure – tape measures stretch and do not give accurate measurements) and some straight pins, measure a width of either one inch or four inches, depending upon the directions you are using, making sure that you pick an area of the swatch away from the borders to avoid distortion. Insert the pins as shown in the photo.


 Write down your stitch gauge. And be brutally honest when measuring – no stretching, no finagling to try to get the gauge. Then measure again in two other places on the swatch. Average your three measurements for your final gauge.
Repeat for the row gauge as shown in the next photo.

Stitch gauge is almost always a mandatory measurement, with the exception of those knitted items that will not be shaped to fit, such as afghans, scarves, washcloths and so on. Row gauge is absolutely critical if you are knitting any raglan garment or a fully-fashioned sleeve, if the pattern is Fair Isle, other colorwork, or certain Aran designs, where the charted design constitutes the entire garment piece and dictates the finished length. Always analyze your pattern to see if row gauge is critical to the finished garment or not. Most of the time row gauge will not matter too much but make sure you know when it does.

If your swatch measures too few stitches, you’ll need to go down a needle size or so to get more stitches and Of course, if your swatch measures too many stitches, you’ll need to go up a needle size or two.
Don’t forget to check your gauge after you’ve knit about 2-3 inches of your first garment piece and again about halfway through. It’s not uncommon for knitting tension to change for a variety of reasons…you’re tense, stressed out, tired, etc. If your gauge is off, switch needle size, frogging if needed back to where your gauge was correct.
Most knitters mistakenly think that making the gauge swatch is an extra, unnecessary step that can be avoided altogether. If there’s one piece of advice I hope you’ll remember, it’s this: always, always, alwaysmake a gauge swatch! If your knitting is so much as a half of an inch off from the recommended gauge, you can end up with a HUGE difference in the size of your finished garment. Take it from me that there’s nothing quite as frustrating as working tirelessly on an adult’s hat that ends up being the size of a toddler’s, or making a baby’s hat that would fit best on a gorilla.
And remember relax! Knitting is fun!

‘Pink Bubbles’ Scarf

As Knitting Galore is ‘Going Pink In October’ Breast Cancer Awareness Month I chose a pink multi yarn to knit this scarf.
Get ready for colder weather with a scarf that’s bold and stylish! Allow me to present this funky ‘Pink Bubbles’ Scarf created with straight knitting needles (and a little attitude).
Don’t you love the great texture?
This is a skinny scarf of ‘bubbles’ that are created by increasing and decreasing at regular intervals, approx 2” wide at widest point and the side edges curl under.The tassels are encased within the first and last bubble.


MATERIALS
100gm Aran type yarn
Straight knitting needles, size 9 (5.50 mm) OR SIZE TO OBTAIN GAUGE

GAUGE
18 sts = 4”;  22 rows = 4” in St st

PATTERN STITCH

Row 1 (RS):  * K3 tog, rep from * across – 10 sts.
Row 2:  Purl.
Row 3:  Knit.
Row 4:  Purl.
Row 5:  * K in front, back, then front of next st, rep from * across – 30 sts.
Row 6:  Purl.
Row 7:  Knit.
Row 8:  Purl.
Rep these 8 rows for Pat St.
SCARF

With straight needles, cast on 30 sts. 
 Work even in St st for 4 rows, end on WS. 
 Work even in Pat St until piece measures approximately 54” from beg, end on Row 8. 
 Bind off.

FINISHING

Sew side edges of cast-on end of scarf tog up to second narrow stripe.  Repeat on bound-off end.

Tassels (Make 2):  Cut eighty 8” long strands of yarn and two 16” long strands.  Put shorter strands tog and tie in the center with one longer strand.  Thread ends of long strand into tapestry needle; insert ends into cast-on end of scarf and through second narrow stripe from the inside out.  Pull tassel into sewn end of scarf so that cast-on end of scarf fits down over top of tassel.  Wrap ends of strand in tapestry needle around scarf several times and fasten off securely.  Pull end of scarf down over top of tassel as far as possible.  Wrap second 16” long strand around first narrow stripe tightly and fasten off securely.  The cast-on end of scarf will roll back slightly giving the appearance of a ruffled edge.  Repeat on the bound-off end of scarf with second tassel.

A lot of new knitters start their knitting careers by knitting scarves as they are easy to knit and provide an excellent project to practice their knitting techniques on. Knitting this scarf will not only give you the perfect opportunity to gain knitting experience but you’ll have a stylish fashion accessory too. A scarf has the dual benefit of both shielding you against extreme weather conditions, as well as giving you that added sparkle.

Saturday Stitch: Garlands of Leaves

Every Saturday I will share with you a new stitch.
Today’s stitch is: Garlands of Leaves.

Ready for Autumn a gorgeous eyelet stitch with ribs looking like leaf garlands. Suitable for sweaters, scarves, throws etc.



Instructions

You need a stitch number multiple of 10 + 2 edge stitches. Repeat the pattern between the * as many times as you like.
Row 1: edge st, * p2, k4, k2tog, yo, p2; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Row 2 & all other wrong side rows: edge st, * k2, p6, k2; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Row 3: edge st, * p2, k3, k2tog, k1, yo, p2; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Row 5: edge st, * p2, yo, sl1kw, k1, psso, k4, p2; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Row 7: edge st, * p2, yo, k1, sl1kw, k1, psso, k3, p2; repeat from * to last st, edge st
Repeat rows 1 through 8.
sl1kw – slip one knitwise
Difficulty level: Medium

Saturday Stitch – Wheat Blowing In The Wind


Every Saturday I will share with you a new stitch.

Today’s stitch is: Wheat Blowing in the Wind


 A beautiful knitting stitch with eyelet wheat ears blown to one side the wind. Suitable for knit  throws, pillow covers or for your scarves, sweaters etc.


Instructions

You need a stitch number multiple of 12 + 1 + 2 edge stitches. Repeat the pattern between the * as many times as you like.
Rows 1 & 3: edge st, * p1, k11; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, edge st
Row 2 & all other wrong side rows: edge st, purl across to last st, edge st
Row 5: edge st, * p1, k1, yo, k1, yo, k2tog, k1, sl1kw, k1, psso, k4; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, edge st
Row 7: edge st, * p1, k2, yo, k1, yo, k2tog, k1, sl1kw, k1, psso, k3; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, edge st
Row 9: edge st, * p1, k3, yo, k1, yo, k2tog, k1, sl1kw, k1, psso, k2; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, edge st
Row 11: edge st, * p1, k4, yo, k1, yo, k2tog, k1, sl1kw, k1, psso, k1; repeat from * to last 2 sts, p1, edge st
Repeat rows 1 through 12.
sl1kw – slip 1 knitwise
Yo – yarn over
psso – pass slip stitch over
Difficulty level: Easy