Wednesday Question: Can You Recommend a Buttonhole?

All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more.
 Here is this weeks question  from Shirley. I never know which buttonhole to use can you recommend one?

Answer:  There are several options. The simplest way to knit a buttonhole is to make an eyelet: just knit 2 stitches together, then bring the yarn over the needle. On the next row, work the yarn over like a regular stitch. This makes a small hole, and it’s appropriate for smallish buttons, baby clothes. It works well in a garter stitch button band, where it is concealed by the ridges of the garter stitch. 



The one-row buttonhole is a firm horizontal buttonhole that is self-edging.


 Bring yarn to the front of work. Slip one stitch purlwise, and then bring yarn to the back of work. Slip the next stitch, and then pass your previously slipped stitch over it. This makes one cast-off stitch for your buttonhole—repeat these two steps until you have cast off enough stitches for the desired width of your buttonhole. Turn your work. Using a cabled cast on, cast on as many stitches as you cast off plus one additional stitch. For example, if you previously cast off 4 stitches, you will want to cast on 5 new stitches using the cabled cast on. Turn your work. With yarn at the back of work, slip one stitch from your left needle onto your right needle, then pass the extra cast-on stitch from your right needle over it. This closes the buttonhole—make sure that you pull your yarn a bit to tighten the hole and prevent gaps. Continue your row according to your chosen stitch pattern.

The two-row buttonhole makes a slit like opening, suitable for larger buttons  but it is loose and you may want to edge it with a buttonhole stitch to reinforce its weak corners and keep it from stretching excessively.


On the first row, cast off enough stitches for the desired width of your buttonhole. The two-row buttonhole is easier to make than the one-row buttonhole, but it is looser and you may want to edge it with a buttonhole stitch to reinforce its weak corners and keep it from stretching excessively.
 On the next row, cast on the same number of cast off stitches from the previous row to create the top edge of the buttonhole.
Using a buttonhole stitch*, stitch your way around the buttonhole. This will stabilize the buttonhole and keep its edges neat.

If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

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