Wednesday Question: How to Pick Up Dropped Stitches




All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by several knitters.
 Question : Can you explain how to pick up a dropped stitch? 





Answer:
No matter how careful you are when knitting, invariably you’re going to drop a stitch. Sometimes you’ll notice this right away and catch it within a row or two. Other times, you’ll see it hiding several rows below where you’re working. Either way, relax. It is fixable. Here’s how you do it.

Picking Up a Dropped Stitch Down a Row—Knitwise
It always happens—you put down your knitting only to come back to dropped stitches that have loosened back a row or two. Never fear. Here’s how you pick them up again.

Insert your left needle through the front of the dropped stitch so it won’t travel any farther.

Insert the left needle under the loose strand directly above the dropped stitch.

With the right needle, pull the dropped stitch over the strand and tip of the needle.

Now knit the stitch on the left needle, and continue on.

Picking Up a Dropped Stitch Down a Row—Purlwise

Sometimes dropped stitches are more obvious on the purl side in stockinette stitch. It just pops out at you, and you can see the horizontal line from each row very clearly.

Insert the left needle into the purl st.
Insert the left needle under the loose strand. It should now be to the right of the dropped stitch on the left needle.

With the right needle, lift the dropped stitch over the strand and the point of the needle.

Pull the strand through the stitch.

Transfer the stitch back to the left needle and purl it.

Picking Up Dropped Stitches Several Rows Down.

This is where a crochet hook really becomes your best friend. When you notice a dropped stitch several rows down, first things first, stick a crochet hook into the stitch. You want to be sure the stitch doesn’t fall any farther.

1. Position your work so you’re above and at the same vertical point as the dropped stitch on the knit side of your work. Pull the needles apart very gently, exposing the horizontal lines from each of the rows missing the stitch.
  1. Look at your work carefully, and assess how many rows the stitch has fallen. The sample shows 4 loose strands, representing 4 rows.
  2. With the crochet hook inserted into the dropped stitch, hook the strand right above the stitch and pull it through.









4.Pull next strand through, and repeat until all the stitches are picked up from the previous rows.

5.Repeat this process until you’re at the same row as the needles. Place the last stitch on the left needle, and continue in the stitch pattern.

Just remember, any glitch in your knitting project is fixable.

                             Have fun, and happy knitting!

If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

Wednesday Question: What Is A Provisional Cast On?



All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by several knitters.
 Question : I have  pattern I would love to try but it says to start wth a provisional cast on. Can you explain what that is and how to do it? Thanks.






Answer:  
A provisional cast-on keeps cast-on stitches “live” so that they can be knit later. It’s a very useful technique when you’re not sure what kind of edging you’ll want or how long to make something. With a provisional cast-on, you can make these decisions at the end of a project. There are a few ways to make a provisional cast-on. This is my favorite…

1: Make a crochet chain using waste yarn — preferably, something smooth and in color which is readily visible against your working yarn, in approximatley the same weight. To make your chain, just grab the strand of yarn with your hook…

and bring it through the loop. Always make the chain several chains longer than the number of stitches you need to pick up, so you have some room for error.


2: When you’re done making the chain as long as you need it to be (plus a few extra) cut the yarn, bring it through the last loop, tug gently to close (gently! You’re going to have to undo that later) and tie a knot in that end, to remind yourself that this is the end you’ll be “unzipping” from later on. Now flip your chain over and take a look at the bumps — they  look a little like purl bumps,  — on the back side (assuming the front side is the “v’s” you see as you are working the chain.) You are going to pick up stitches through these bumps.

3: Start picking up stitches through the bumps. I “pick” at stitches to pick them up, wrapping each one around the needle..
4: …and bringing it through. (Leave a long tail so you can weave that end in later.)

5: Now you have picked up your stitches. Follow your pattern’s directions.

6: for this demonstration Ijust knit a few rows of stockinette and cast off.

7: Remember how I mentioned in Step 2 that you should make a little knot so you will know from which end to unzip your cast on?

8:Take the end with the knot in it and bring it back out through the loop you drew it through to close your chain, this will re-opening your chain. Now give that end a tug (a gentle tug, just in case there was some snaggage when you picked up your stitches.)

9:Now your stitches are free, place them on a needle, ready to work.
I hope you find this useful!
If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

Wednesday Question: How to Steek


All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by several knitters.
 Question : I have a fair isle pattern I would love to try but I’m not sure about Steeking can you explain it? Thanks






Answer: The simplest way to knit Fair Isle or stranded knitting projects is to work them in the round, even if the finished project is intended to be flat or have slits such as arm holes or a cardigan opening. It’s much easier and faster to do stranded knitting all from the right side (and harder to get lost in your pattern).

The only potential problem with knitting a project that’s supposed to be flat or have openings in the round is that you have to cut your knitting to make it the right shape. That’s accomplished by knitting and cutting a steek, which sounds incredibly scary, but once you’ve done it once, like so many other things in knitting, you’ll wonder what the fuss was about.
To knit a Fair Isle or stranded knitting project in the round that’s meant to be flat, you’ll have to add a few stitches to make the area where you’ll cut. Patterns can have as few as 4 or as many as 10 steek stitches.

Before you take scissors to steek, you need to sew yourself a bit of insurance. Using either a needle and sewing thread or a sewing machine, stitch two rows of stitches on each side of the center of your steek stitches.

This is faster to do on a sewing machine, and might make you feel more confident that you’ve gotten all the threads of yarn caught up in the stitching because you can set the machine to tiny stitches. But the stretch of knitting can be a little tricky to work with on a machine, and you have to be able to sew straight or you might end up having to do a bit of ripping, which is no fun at all on knitting.
Sewing by hand takes a while to ensure that you’re getting every last stitch covered, but it’s no problem to do it that way, and a lot easier to keep a straight sewing line.

Here’s the part of steek knitting that scares a lot of knitters who have never tried it before: the actual cutting of the steek.

Remember how we just sewed a couple rows of stitches in our steek to reinforce it? That will guarantee that your stitches won’t unravel when you cut them. Even if you make a sloppy cut and cut some of the stitches of the steek, it will only unravel back to that sewing line. Your actual project will not be affected.
So take a deep breath, grab your scissors and cut, slowly and carefully, through the middle of the steek. In the example piece, that’s between stitches two and three of the steek.
You’ll notice that you’re not actually cutting the stitches, you’re just getting the yarn between the stitches. But if you happen to cut a stitch, don’t worry about it; that’s what the sewing is for.

The hard part’s over. To finish your steek, all you have to do is fold back that stitches that formed the steek to the wrong side of the work and sew them down using yarn and a yarn needle.

Make sure as you go that you’re sewing evenly along the side, not letting the steek stitches show on the right side of the work and not pulling the first column of pattern stitches onto the back of the work.
If you happened to nick any of the stitches while you were cutting the steek, you can cover that mistake with sewing now. If you didn’t weave in your ends, you can also hide the ends in these seams so you don’t have to worry about them. This does add bulk, though, so you might not want to do it, say, on a cardigan front.
Finish the other side of the steek in the same manner. Marvel at your knitting mojo and don’t fear steeks again!

If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

I

Wednesday Question : What Is An I – Cord?







All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by a new knitter. Question from Angelena : What is an I – cord?






Answer: An I-cord is a narrow piece of knitting made on double-pointed needles that can be made as long as you like for a thousand different uses, either utilitarian or decorative. They can be made of any yarn as long as you have double-pointed needles that are similar in size to the gauge of the yarn (use smaller needles with finer yarn, bigger needles with heavier yarn).

To make an I-cord, cast on a few stitches (usually between three and six). Knit the first row. Slide the stitches to the opposite end of the needle. Now the working yarn is at the bottom of the row. Knit again, pulling the working yarn up the back of the piece so you can work with it.
Again slide the stitches to the opposite end of the needle. Repeat in this manner for as long as you like. As you pull the yarn the back will close up on itself, like magic. If you have a very wide I-cord you might need to help it along by giving the cord a tug when you’ve worked a few inches.

I-cords are great because once you’ve made one, you’ll start thinking of all sorts of uses for them. Here are just a few ways you might use them:

  • Strap or handles for a purse or bag.
  • Straps for a knitted shirt or dress.
  • Use it as a belt.
  • Make a headband.
  • Sew the cord together to make a flower, a spiral, or some other shape you can use on another knitted project.
  • Use as a tie for a hoodie or in place of elastic in a hem.
  • Jewelry – bracelets and necklace etc.
If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

Wednesday Question : How To Weave In Ends?







All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by a new knitter. Question from Gwen : What is the best way to weave in the ends when knitting is finished?






Answer : There is no one way to weave in yarn ends. Many knitters develope their own methods or style. Whichever way you choose to weave your ends in, you need to be sure of the following:

  • Your weaving shows as little as possible (preferably not at all) on the right side of your fabric.
  • The area where you have woven in your ends is not noticeably lumpier than the rest of the fabric.
  • You try to avoid using knots.
  • If you are using smooth, slippery yarn, you should reverse direction and weave another inch or so to lock the yarn into place.
  • Every few stitches, stretch your knitted fabric a bit to ensure that you weaving does not cause it to gather.
If you follow these guidelines, you can feel confident in your darning. Turn to the right side of your work often to check and see how your weaving is shaping up. Some knitters feel secure enough after only a few stitches of weaving, others spend a few inches tying up the loose ends. It is mostly a matter of personal comfort. We all have our favourites. To help you pick yours, I’ve gathered together some of my favourite techniques for hiding ends. 





When working a yarn end in on knit stitches, you can often just follow a row of stitches as you would when duplicate stitching. Weaving your ends in on knit stitches can be done as follows (contrasting yarn has been used for visual clarity):








Another method of weaving in on knit stitches involves traveling vertically up or down the stitches, passing through one side of each knit stitch as you go. This motion is similar to whip stitching:











When working a yarn end in on purl stitches, one technique is to follow the bottom loops of a row of purl stitches, alternating the direction in which you insert yarn needle. Begin by inserting the needle upwards through the first loop, then downwards through the next loop, etc. (contrasting yarn has been used for visual clarity):









Another method of weaving in on purl stitches involves traveling diagonally up or down the stitches, passing through purl bumps as you go. Begin by inserting your needle upwards (or downwards) into a bump, then in the same direction into the bump that is diagonal to it in either direction, etc.:






If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

Wednesday Questions and Answers






All knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by a new knitter.
Question from Brenda Buckley – Can you tell me how to cast on using the long tail method?







Answer - Leave a long tail on the slip knot. I’ve seen several ways to guesstimate how long the tail needs to be. One good way is to cast on a small number of stitches, 10 for example, then unravel to find out how much yarn is required for that number of stitches and work out the amount of yarn needed for the total number of stitches. Another good way to avoid this problem is by using two balls of yarn, or both ends of the same ball of yarn, joined at the slip knot. Just cast on one extra stitch and unknot the slip knot when you’re finished casting on. You’ll only need one needle for this method. Make a slip knot and place it on the needle. Grab both ends of the yarn in your hand and secure with your fingers. Then insert your thumb and forefinger between the strands of yarn and pull the needle downwards, creating a V shape with the yarn, like so..

Holding the needle in your right hand, bring the tip up through the loop on your thumb…



Then down through the loop on your finger, grabbing the yarn…


And pulling it down through the loop on your thumb…



let the loop of yarn on your thumb slip off. Bring your thumb back under the loose strand of yarn to tighten the stitch on the needle.



Repeat for each stitch to be cast on.

This type of cast on is quite sturdy, but does have a tendency to be too tight. I often use a larger needle than the one that I’ll be knitting with or two needles held together. The long-tail cast on leaves a row of purl bumps, so if you’ll be knitting in stockinette stitch, begin with a wrong side row.

If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

Wednesday Question & Answer



All beginning knitters have questions about the best way to do things, why different things happen while they are knitting, how to fix knitting mistakes and more. Here is this weeks questions posed by a new knitter.














Question by Mary Browne – 

What am I doing wrong with my purling?

I’m learning how to knit, and how to “purl”. But when I do my purl stitch, it always adds one more loop. So I’ll start with 17, for example, and by the time I look down, I’m doing like 27! Is purling supposed to add one more, or am I doing something wrong? Please help! :-O

Answer:
No, it is not supposed to add any additional stitches. 

When you purl, the working yarn needs to be in front of the work. If you bring it from the back each time, you could be adding an extra loop.

To help you here are four easy steps to follow:
1. With the yarn at the front of the work, insert the right hand needle from right to left through the front of the first stitch on the left hand needle.

2. Wind the yarn round the right hand needle.

3. Draw a loop through to the back.

4. Slip the original stitch off the left hand needle.

Mary this should help you keep to the correct number of stitches.


        Good Luck!
If you have a knitting question for Knitting Galore, please email it to : dbjones5559@hotmail.co.uk  or  Please  post it as a comment here.  All questions will be answered, and many are selected and answered each wednesday here on the Blog. 

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