‘Thoughful Thursady’ Knitting Winter Warmers for Orphans.

The number of children orphaned each day in the world is around 10,000. More than half of the orphans live in the streets where they face many threats and risks. Unfortunately, orphans are kidnapped every day in many parts of the world, they are abused by prostitution gangs, organ mafia, begging networks and missionary institutions. Every orphan who is taken care of means that we will have a brighter future.







A plea from ‘Lily’ Love In the Language of Yarn!

In September 2012 I will be visiting an orphanage in Kayseri, Turkey with a group of volunteers. The orphange is home to 115 children at the moment. I hope to take with me a parcel for each child. I am busy knitting a ‘Lily’ Bear for each child. Knitters and Crocheters I need your help! Age groups are 3-6yrs, 7-10yrs and 12-14yrs. Boys and Girls. Hat, scarf, glove sets for each child 
Can you help?

If you can we would need to recieve them by 12th september 2012.
For more information on ‘LILY’ to can find us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/LilyLoveInTheLanguageOfYarn

It is the children who are affected most by the troubles in regions hit by conflicts, hunger and wars.





Please Help If You Can!





Here’s a free knitting pattern from Patons to help get you started.


MATERIALS:
  • Patons® Astra (50 g/1.75 oz)
Boy’s Version (all sizes)
  • Main Color (MC):
    • (Blue) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast A: (Variegated) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast B: (Orange) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
Girl’s Version (all sizes)
  • Main Color (MC):
  • (Red) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast A: (Variegated) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
  • Contrast B: (Yellow) 1 (1-1-3) ball(s)
Knitting Needles:
  • Hat and Scarf: Size 4 mm (U.S. 6) knitting needles or size needed to obtain tension.
  • Mittens: Set of size 4 mm (U.S. 6) double pointed knitting needles or size needed to obtain tension.
SIZES:
  • Scarf: 6 x 46 ins [15 x 117 cm].
  • Hat: To fit child 2/4 yrs (6/10 yrs).
  • Mittens: To fit child 2/4 yrs (6/8 yrs – 10 yrs).
TENSION
22 sts and 28 rows = 4 ins [10 cm] in stocking st.
ABBREVIATIONS
Alt = Alternate.
Beg = Beginning.
Cont = Continue(ity).
Dec = Decrease.
Inc = Increase 1 stitch by knitting into front and back of next stitch.
K = Knit.
K2tog = Knit 2 stitches together.
M1 = make one st by picking up horizontal loop lying before next st and knitting into back of loop.
M1P = make one st by picking up horizontal loop lying before next st and purling into back of loop.
P = Purl.
Pat = Pattern.
Psso = Pass slipped stitch over.
Rep = Repeat.
Rem = Remaining.
Rnd(s) = Round(s).
RS = Right side.
Sl1 = Slip next stitch knitwise.
St(s) = Stitch(es).
Tog = Together.
WS = Wrong side.
INSTRUCTIONS
The instructions are written for smallest size. If changes are necessary for larger size(s) the instructions will be written thus ( ). Numbers for each size are shown in the same color throughout the pattern. When only one number is given in black, it applies to all sizes.


Stripe Pat
With MC work 4 rows.
With A work 4 rows.
With B work 2 rows.
With MC work 2 rows.
With A work 4 rows.
These 16 rows form Stripe Pat.
EARFLAP HAT
First Ear Flap
With MC and pair of needles, cast on 10 sts.
1st row: (RS). Knit.
2nd row: P1. M1P. Purl to last st. M1P. P1.
3rd row: K1. M1. Knit to last st. M1. K1.
Rep last 2 rows twice more, then 2nd row once. 24 sts.
Work 12 rows even in stocking st, ending with RS facing for next row. Break yarn. Leave sts on a spare needle.
Second Ear Flap
Work as given for First Ear Flap. Do not break yarn.
Body of Hat: (Joining row). With MC, cast on 8 (9) sts. Knit these 8 (9) sts. K24 across Second Ear Flap. Turn. Cast on 35 (39) sts. Turn. K24 across First Ear Flap. Turn. Cast on 8 (9) sts. 99 (105) sts.
Purl 1 row.
With A, proceed as follows:
1st row: (RS). Purl
2nd and 3rd rows: Knit.
4th row: Purl.
Last 4 rows form Texture Pat.
Beg with 9th row of Stripe Pat, cont in Stripe Pat and rep last 4 rows of Texture Pat 7 times more, dec 2 (0) sts evenly across last row. 97 (105) sts.
Shape top: Keeping cont of Stripe Pat, proceed as follows:
1st row: K1. *K2tog. K10 (11). Rep from * to end of row. 89 (97) sts.
2nd and alt rows: Purl.
3rd row: K1. *K2tog. K9 (10). Rep from * to end of row. 81 (89) sts.
5th row: K1. *K2tog. K8 (9). Rep from * to end of row. 73 (81) sts.
6th row: Purl.

Cont in same manner, dec 8 sts on next and every following alt row 5 (6) times more. 25 sts.
Next row: K1. *K2tog. Rep from * to end of row. 13 sts.
Break yarn leaving a long end. Draw end through rem sts and fasten securely. Sew back seam.

Braid: (make 3).
Cut A, 15 ins [38 cm] long. Take 12 strands tog, fold in half and knot into fringe at end of each earflap and at top of Hat as shown in picture. Braid each Fringe. Knot securely and trim ends evenly.
MITTENS


RIGHT MITTEN
**With MC and set of four knitting needles, cast on 28 (36-44) sts. Divide sts on 3 needles as follows: 12 (12-16) sts on 1st needle, 8 (12-16) sts on 2nd needle and 8 (12-12) sts on 3rd needle. Join in rnd. Place marker on first st.
Beg with 1st row of Stripe Pat.
Proceed as follows:
1st rnd: *K1. P1. Rep from * around. Rep last rnd of (K1. P1) ribbing for 11/2 (2-2) ins [4 (5-5) cm] and inc 4 sts evenly across last rnd. 32 (40-48) sts.
Keeping cont of Stripe Pat, knit 6 (8-10) rnds.**
Shape thumb gusset: Cont in Stripe Pat, proceed as follows:
1st rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in each of next 2 sts. Knit to end of rnd.
2nd and alt rnds: Knit.
3rd rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K2. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
5th rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K4. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
7th rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K6. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
9th rnd: K16 (20-24). Inc 1 st in next st. K8. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd. 42 (50-58) sts.
11th rnd: K28 (32-36). Slip last 12 sts onto a safety pin (thumb opening). Knit to end of rnd.
12th rnd: Knit, casting on 2 sts over slipped sts. 32 (40-48) sts.
***Cont in Stripe Pat, knit in rnds until work from beg measures 6 (7-8) ins [15 (18-20.5) cm].
Rearrange sts as follows: 16 (20-24) sts on 1st needle. 8 (10-12) sts on 2nd needle. 8 (10-12) sts on 3rd needle.
Shape Top: 1st rnd: 1st needle: Sl1. K1. psso. Knit to last 2 sts. K2tog. 2nd needle: Sl1. K1. psso. Knit to end of needle. 3rd needle: Knit to last 2 sts. K2tog.
Dec 4 sts on every rnd, as before, until there are 8 sts. Break yarn, leaving a long end.
Thread end through rem 8 sts. Draw up and fasten securely.
Thumb: With MC, K12 from safety pin.
Pick up and knit 2 sts at base of thumb.
Divide these 14 sts onto 3 needles.
With MC, knit 9 (11-15) rnds.
Next rnd: (K2tog) 7 times.
Next rnd: (K2tog) 3 times. K1.
Break MC leaving a long end. Thread end through rem 4 sts. Draw up and fasten securely.***
LEFT MITTEN
Work from ** to ** as given for Right Mitten.
Shape thumb gusset: Cont in Stripe Pat, proceed as follows:
1st rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in each of next 2 sts. Knit to end of rnd.
2nd and alt rnds: Knit.
3rd rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K2. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
5th rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K4. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
7th rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K6. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd.
9th rnd: K14 (18-22). Inc 1 st in next st. K8. Inc 1 st in next st. Knit to end of rnd. 42 (50-58) sts.
11th rnd: K26 (30-34) sts. Slip last 12 sts onto safety pin (thumb opening). Knit to end of rnd.
12th rnd: Knit, casting on 2 sts over slipped sts. 32 (40-48) sts.
Work from *** to *** as given for Right Mitten.
SCARF
With MC and pair of needles, cast on 33 sts.
1st row: (RS). Purl.
2nd and 3rd rows: Knit.
4th row: Purl.
Last 4 rows form Texture Pat.
First 4 rows of Stripe Pat are complete.
Keeping cont of Stripe Pat, rep last 4 rows of Texture Pat until work from beg measures 46 ins [117 cm], ending with RS facing for next row. Cast off knitwise.
Fringe: Cut A 10 ins [25.5 cm] long. Take 4 strands tog, fold in half and knot into fringe 3/4 inch [2 cm] apart across each end of scarf. Trim fringe evenly.
Colorful Winter Set Pattern

‘Thoughtful Thursday’ Knit A Square

Knit a square project.

KasCare

Please knit a square (or more) and send them to Africa to make up blankets for the children.


Crocheting and knitting for charity, especially for children in need, is a meditative act of love. More importantly, it makes a difference. There are many millions of abandoned and vulnerable children and AIDS orphans in southern Africa, who live in dire poverty. Many lack the very basics we take for granted—love, shelter, food, education and warmth.

Your contribution of squares to this crochet and knitting project will add to the many thousands of 8″/20cm squares from around the world, which are joined into blankets and distributed to these children.
The finished blankets add more than warmth to the children’s lives. As co-founder of KasCare, Ronda said in a South African press interview:“ They are a currency we use to tell the children exactly how beloved they are. We tell them they are the future, unique and special.”
You can find the details of how you can donate on the website:
 www.knit-a-square.com and you can aslo subscribe to their newsletter Square Circle. As your squares arrive, they are collected, sorted and bundled into blanket packs by the KasCare Volunteers They then organise sewing and distribution days which are recorded in the Square Circle, so you can see and enjoy the results of your wonderful work.


The June Challenge is – ‘What a beautiful world’
 to knit or crochet squares that commemorate the “World Environmental Day” and to celebrate our Planet. Maybe,beautiful squares in the colours of the Oceans, Forests, sunsets or showingendangered animals and plants.
Here is one of my squares I knitted for this challenge – A giraffe



Every 14 seconds a child will become an orphan!

We all understand how awful it is to be cold, but many of us have not experienced the misery of being cold all night, every night, hungry, and perhaps sick as well. Many of the children are themselves infected by HIV AIDS. As it is an auto immune disease, keeping warm helps their ability to stay well.
Keeping a child with HIV AIDS warm is vitalPlease help if you can.
www.knit-a-square.com
www.facebook.com/knitasquare

‘Thoughtful Thursday’ Helpful Info for Charity Knitters

I think one reason we all knit for charity is because the need is literally everywhere. The need for charity knitting is as far away as the other side of the world, and it is as close as our own downtown areas and even our own neighborhoods. 
 Do you find, either occasionally or more often than not, that you would like to touch members of your own community with your charity knitting? I know I do. 
Knitting for someone else who has a greater need than yourself often helps put your problems in perspective. Many knitters enjoy knitting for charity, but if you’ve never done it before you may not know where to start. 
 I want to offer you some options to consider when you would like to donate your charity knitting projects a little closer to home. 




Stuffed toys: Make stuffed toys such as teddy bears, monkeys, and dolls, and offer them to places such as fire houses, hospitals, social service departments, and police departments. Such toys can be genuine godsends for children in traumatic situations, such as long-term illnesses, fires, and cases of abuse and neglect.



Hats and scarves: Most towns have homeless shelters, and I have yet to hear of one that will turn away a box of knitted hats and scarves. Particularly in areas where winters are extremely cold, these are a tremendous help to shelter residents. Domestic violence shelters will often take them, as well. 




Blankets: Afghans can also be donated to homeless and domestic violence shelters. Lap blankets and baby blankets can be donated to hospitals, where they may be used for babies, especially preemies, and those recovering from amputation surgery. 











Chemo caps: Hospitals of all kinds, especially those with cancer centers, will always be glad to accept donated caps for people who have lost their hair from chemotherapy. 








Premature baby clothing: Any hospital with a labor and delivery floor will likely be thrilled to accept hats, layette items, and blankets sized to fit preemies. 


Remember, before you take a trip to a local shelter, hospital, or fire/police department, be sure to call them ahead of time and ask if they will accept whatever you have to donate. Some may have guidelines; others may not be able to accept the items in question for one reason or another. Most, however, will be very glad to accept whatever you have to offer!

Another thing to keep in mind is that the need for garments or knitted items is all year round and not just in the winter time. Shelters and hospitals are often overwhelmed with donations at the holidays, but still need items throughout the year. There are nunerous international organisations who require knitted items and may have a local Office near  you or a collection point not too far away. 


Links to other ‘Thoughful Thursday’ posts you might like:

‘Lily’ Love In the Language of Yarn
Knit A Square
Military Heros
Sands Stillbirth and Neonatal Death
Cure Caps
Hugs for Homeless Animals
Loving Hands
Teddies for Tragedies
The Mending Hearts Project
Knit With Love
Keeping cancer victims warm
Lisas Stars
Bridge and Beyond
Strickpate
Oxfam

‘Thoughful Thursday’ The Military Heros Comfort Project

Have you ever stopped to think of just how much our veterans sacrifice for us? I don’t do it nearly often enough. But consider what we ask — if not expect — them to do: leave their families, their homes, their lives in order to stay in a foreign land, with very little money, precious little in the way of creature comforts, and nonstop uncertainty and unpredictability. Oh, and they don’t know when they leave if they’ll ever see their families again.
All of this, just to make sure that we still have freedom — freedom to speak out against the government; freedom to pursue whatever life path we wish; freedom from unjust governmental treatment; freedom to worship in whatever manner we desire; freedom to go about our daily lives without the fear that at any moment we will have bombs falling from the sky.
This is not to say that we will necessarily agree with every military conflict. However, it is to say that the people who have chosen very difficult lives in order to keep us safe and free have made tremendous sacrifices to help millions of people they do not know. That demands not only our respect, but also our appreciation.
As charity knitters, it seems the least we can do to help our men and women in uniform to pick up our needles in support of them. Today’s ‘thoughful Thursday’  featured charity is dedicated to helping these people know they are loved and supported, as well as their families.The Military Heroes Comfort Project is a group of crafters dedicated to making comfort items for Military cancer patients and their families at Military Hospitals.


 Comfort Items are awarded to local Heroes in recognition of brave service they have given to show appreciation for each service member’s sacrifices, their love of country, their bravery, and commend their efforts to make the world a safer place. 


How can you help?



As they face the great battle of fighting the insidious cell called cancer, MH Comfort Project supplies comfort items, and sincerely hope they will be comforted with the hope, grace, gratitude, peace, and love in which these comfort items have been made especially for each of them by the hands of grateful fellow citizens of the United States and members of the Military Heroes Comfort Project team.  
M.H. Comfort are looking for donations of comfort items, no money please. Just items that make our patient, military heroes more comfortable: lap quilts, afghans, hats, slippers, socks, thank you notes, cotton and jersey material, batting for quilts, thread, yarn, hats (of all kinds), certificate paper, etc.

Please send your items to:
Military Heroes Comfort Project
R.J. Davis – President
3327 Nansemond River Drive

Suffolk, VA 23435

You can find all the details at M:H.Comfort on google+ 

M.H.Comfort are a relatively new volunteer group and have managed to donate over 150 comfort items to local military hospitals in Virginia. 

         Please help them if you can!

Here are a couple of free patterns to get you started.


 Family Hat Knitting Pattern

Size
To fit head circumference 35 (40, 45, 50, 55, 60)cm
Age approximately 6 months (12 months, 18 months, teen, woman, man)
Materials
Yarn:
Double knitting type (8 ply) yarn of your choice. Approximate quantities are 140m (160m, 190m, 240m, 270m, 300m)

Needles:
3.25mm and 4mm circular needle, 40cm long.
A set of 4mm dpns
Tension
22sts to 10cm over stocking stitch on 4mm needles
Abbreviations
K2tog = knit 2 sts together
Pattern
Using 3.25mm needles cast on 78, (90, 102, 108, 120, 132)sts, join for circular knitting and work 9.5 (9.5, 12, 14.5, 15.5, 16.5) cm of k1, p1 rib.
Change to 4mm needles and work 8.25 (8.25, 10, 12, 12.75, 14)cm st st (knit every round).
Decrease for crown:
Note: I have written the crown instructions for each size separately for ease of knitting. Follow the instructions for the size hat you are knitting.
Size 35cm
K 2 rounds
(K11, k2tog) 6 times (72sts)
K 2 rounds
(K10, k2tog) 6 times (66sts)
K 1 round
(K9, k2tog) 6 times (60sts)
K 1 round
(K8, k2tog) 6 times (54sts)
K 1 round
(K7, k2tog) 6 times (48sts)
K 1 round
(K6, k2tog) 6 times (42sts)
(K5, k2tog) 6 times (36sts)
(K4, k2tog) 6 times (30sts)
(K3, k2tog) 6 times (24sts)
(K2, k2tog) 6 times (18sts)
(K1, k2tog) 6 times (12sts)
(k2tog) 6 times (6sts)
Size 40cm
K2 rounds
(K13, k2tog) 6 times (84sts)
K 1 round
(K12, k2tog) 6 times (78sts)
K 1 round
(K11, k2tog) 6 times (72sts)
K 1 rounds
(K10, k2tog) 6 times (66sts)
K 1 round
(K9, k2tog) 6 times (60sts)
K 1 round
(K8, k2tog) 6 times (54sts)
K 1 round
(K7, k2tog) 6 times (48sts)
(K6, k2tog) 6 times (42sts)
(K5, k2tog) 6 times (36sts)
(K4, k2tog) 6 times (30sts)
(K3, k2tog) 6 times (24sts)
(K2, k2tog) 6 times (18sts)
(K1, k2tog) 6 times (12sts)
(k2tog) 6 times (6sts)
Size 45cm
K 2 rounds
(K15, k2tog) 6 times (96sts)
K 1 round
(K14, k2tog) 6 times (90sts)
K 1 round
(K13, k2tog) 6 times (84sts)
K 1 round
(K12, k2tog 6 times (78sts)
K 1 round
(K11, k2tog) 6 times (72sts)
K 1 round
(K10, k2tog) 6 times (66sts)
K 1 round
(K9, k2tog) 6 times (60sts)
K 1 round
(K8, k2tog) 6 times (54sts)
(K7, k2tog) 6 times (48sts)
(K6, k2tog) 6 times (42sts)
(K5, k2tog) 6 times (36sts)
(K4, k2tog) 6 times (30sts)
(K3, k2tog) 6 times (24sts)
(K2, k2tog) 6 times (18sts)
(K1, k2tog) 6 times (12sts)
(k2tog) 6 times (6sts)
Size 50cm
K 2 rounds
(K16, K2tog) 6 times (102sts)
K 2 rounds
(K15, k2tog) 6 times (96sts)
K 2 rounds
(K14, k2tog) 6 times (90sts)
K 1 round
(K13, k2tog) 6 times (84sts)
K 1 round
(K12, k2tog 6 times (78sts)
K 1 round
(K11, k2tog) 6 times (72sts)
K 1 round
(K10, k2tog) 6 times (66sts)
K 1 round
(K9, k2tog) 6 times (60sts)
K 1 round
(K8, k2tog) 6 times (54sts)
K 1 round
(K7, k2tog) 6 times (48sts)
(K6, k2tog) 6 times (42sts)
(K5, k2tog) 6 times (36sts)
(K4, k2tog) 6 times (30sts)
(K3, k2tog) 6 times (24sts)
(K2, k2tog) 6 times (18sts)
(K1, k2tog) 6 times (12sts)
(k2tog) 6 times (6sts)
Size 55cm
K 2 rounds
(K18, k2tog) 6 times (114sts)
K 2 rounds
(K17, k2tog) 6 times (108sts)
K 2 rounds
(K16, K2tog) 6 times (102sts)
K 2 rounds
(K15, k2tog) 6 times (96sts)
K 1 round
(K14, k2tog) 6 times (90sts)
K 1 round
(K13, k2tog) 6 times (84sts)
K 1 round
(K12, k2tog 6 times (78sts)
K 1 round
(K11, k2tog) 6 times (72sts)
K 1 round
(K10, k2tog) 6 times (66sts)
K 1 round
(K9, k2tog) 6 times (60sts)
K 1 round
(K8, k2tog) 6 times (54sts)
(K7, k2tog) 6 times (48sts)
(K6, k2tog) 6 times (42sts)
(K5, k2tog) 6 times (36sts)
(K4, k2tog) 6 times (30sts)
(K3, k2tog) 6 times (24sts)
(K2, k2tog) 6 times (18sts)
(K1, k2tog) 6 times (12sts)
(k2tog) 6 times (6sts)
Size 60cm
K 2 rounds
(K20, k2tog) 6 times (126sts)
K 2 rounds
(K19, k2tog) 6 times (120sts)
K 2 rounds
(K18, k2tog) 6 times (114sts)
K 1 round
(K17, k2tog) 6 times (108sts)
K 1 round
(K16, K2tog) 6 times (102sts)
K 1 round
(K15, k2tog) 6 times (96sts)
K 1 round
(K14, k2tog) 6 times (90sts)
K 1 round
(K13, k2tog) 6 times (84sts)
K 1 round
(K12, k2tog 6 times (78sts)
K 1 round
(K11, k2tog) 6 times (72sts)
K 1 round
(K10, k2tog) 6 times (66sts)
K 1 round
(K9, k2tog) 6 times (60sts)
K 1 round
(K8, k2tog) 6 times (54sts)
(K7, k2tog) 6 times (48sts)
(K6, k2tog) 6 times (42sts)
(K5, k2tog) 6 times (36sts)
(K4, k2tog) 6 times (30sts)
(K3, k2tog) 6 times (24sts)
(K2, k2tog) 6 times (18sts)
(K1, k2tog) 6 times (12sts)
(k2tog) 6 times (6sts)
Finishing
Cut yarn, thread through remaining stitches and fasten off
Darn in loose ends


Stash Buster afghans

These use up all those leftovers you have from your other projects very quickly. As you can see from the photo you can strand more than one yarn together to get a heathered effect or some special color and texture variations. You can use decorative stitches when making one of these but the color combinations add a lot of interest all on their own.
NOTE: You do need to pay attention to your knitting tension when working with different weight yarns. If you pull too tightly on the thinner yarn this will cause the afghan to buckle where the tension changes. Makes it hard to fold neatly when that happens.


Materials

Seven assorted partial or full skeins of yarn in coordinating colours. As you can see from the picture if I run out of one colour that I’ve chosen, I move on to another partial skein for when that colour comes up in the rotation again. That also adds interest to the colourway of the blanket.
Designate one color as the main colour for the afghan, you will need approximately 4-5 full skeins of that colour.
Knitting needles Size 8  -(4mm) or size that will work with the yarn that you’ve chosen
Large eye yarn needle

Finished Size

40″ x 65″ – this makes an excellant size for a recliner blanket or taking a nap on the couch.

Gauge

Totally dependant upon the yarn being used. The pattern is set up for knitting worsted weight yarn.

Afghan pattern

Using the MC loosely cast on 200 sts. Work in Seed Stitch (k1, p1, reverse on the next row) for 5 inches from the beginning of the afghan.
On the next row, work 25 sts in Seed Stich, place marker, knit to the last 25 sts, place marker, work in established pattern in Seed Stitch to finish the row.
On the next row, work the border in Seed Stitch using the MC, attach another color being sure to cross the yarn strands to avoid any holes on the border edge, purl the main body of the afghan to the marker, attach another skein of the MC, finish the row with the Seed Stitch border.
Repeat the previous two rows in pattern until the afghan measures 60 inches from the beginning.
The colourway as per the picture for the Blue Stashbuster Afghan is as follows – 
Colour # of Rows
Light Blue 5
Main color 2
Green 3
Main color 2
Gray 1
Main color 2
Varigated 3
Main color 2
Dark Blue 5
Main color 2
Purple 3
Main color 2
Neutral/Brown 1
Main color 2
Light Blue 3 The 7 yarn colorway begins again here
Main color 2
Green 5
Main color 2

When the colorway begins again you’re at a different point in the row number progression. This helps to add color interest to the afghan instead of having the same colors form the same row repeats throughout.
Continue to work in the established color pattern with the number of rows given above until the afghan measures 60 inches from the beginning.
Use the MC to work the final Knit or Purl row.
Work the remaining 5 inches of the afghan in Seed Stitch using the MC to complete the border. Bind off all stitches loosely.

Finishing:

Weave in all loose ends.

‘Thoughtful Thursday’ Sands Stillbirth & Neonatal Death Charity.

Remembering a beautiful angel Lily Iris Gibson born sleeping 18 July 2010 and always in our thoughts xxx
 


 Sands Stillbirth & Neonatal Death Charity.

SANDS is a national charity, established by bereaved parents in 1981 and has  3 core aims which are to:  Support anyone affected by the death of a baby; to promote the emotional, psychological and physical well-being of parents, their families and friends, when a baby dies in utero, at birth or soon after birth.
To work in partnership with health professionals to improve the quality of care and services offered to bereaved families; and
To promote research and changes in practice that could help to reduce the loss of babies’ lives by promoting research and the implementation of best practice that will help identify the causes and reduce the incidence of the death of a baby in utero, at birth or soon after birth, and to publish the results of such research.

Heartwrenching Facts: 17 babies die every day in the UK (11 are stillbirths, 6 are neonatal deaths) over 6,500 baby deaths a year – the equivalent of 16 jumbo jets crashing every year with no survivors.

Ten times more babies are stillborn than die of cot death every year in the UK.
The stillbirth rate has remained almost unchanged for the past 10 years. (CMACE)
1 in every 200 babies are stillborn in the UK
1 in every 300 babies born in the UK die in the first four weeks of life
 In one in four stillbirths the cause remains unexplained. These babies are born perfectly formed, with no clear reason why they died. We need to understand what is causing these deaths.
The majority of unexplained stillbirths are in pregnancies that were previously considered low risk. We need better ways to identify babies who are at risk.
1 in 5 stillborn babies is much smaller than they should be, yet we have no good method to detect these babies in utero and act to deliver them before they die.
Stillbirth is when a baby is born dead after 24 completed weeks of pregnancy
Neonatal death is when a baby is born alive but dies within the first 28 days of life

PLEASE GET INVOLVED
SANDS relies on the initiative of the many individuals and companies that are out there fundraising –  contributions really help  and they are extremely grateful and value every single penny raised.   
There are so many ways that you can support, from holding a coffee morning to collecting used postage stamps.  You can jump out of an aeroplane or abseil down the Tyne Bridge!  Sign up for The Weather Lottery or organise a sponsored walk.  You can take part in a wide range of events or why not fundraise for SANDS by organising your own event. 
The link to donate to sands here
Knitters can help !
They have recently had a large numbers of orders for their Always Loved, Never Forgotten Memory Boxes, and stock of hand knitted blankets is beginning to run low. These handmade blankets form a very special part of the box provided to bereaved parents and we have been told how much comfort they bring parents at such a difficult time.The memory box also has a camera, 2 teddy bears, a small keepsake bag for a lock of hair and information about the support that Sands can offer. The pattern is very simple as can be knitted with our without the lace edging and requires approximately 200g of white double knit wool. SANDS  would be incredibly grateful for any donated blankets and hope that knitters everywhere are happy to assist with their plea and please can you spread the word to family and friends.
 The blanket is our basic pattern. This pattern knits to approx. a 24″ square. It will always come square.
250gm of Double Knit Wool in white or cream and size 8 (UK) – 4 mm needles 

BASIC BLANKET

Cast on 1 stitch
Next row :- Make the one stitch into two stitches.
Next row :- Knit 1, into the next stitch make another,3 stitches on needle.
Continue to knit, ALWAYS knit the first stitch and into the 2nd stitch make another.
Only increase this way at the BEGINNING of a row
Continue until you have worked 20 inches if you are putting border all the way round, 22 inches if you are just putting borders top and bottom or 24 inches if it is to go just on the top edge or no border at all (this should ensure you can complete the blanket with your 250 grms).
Knit 1 row plain.
Next row:- Knit 1, Knit 2 together, Knit to end of row. Continue this way, always knit the 1st stitch then decrease into the next stitch by knitting 2 together until 1 stitch remains. You should now have a neat square.
LACE EDGINGThis lace border makes the easy blanket, very special. 
Using Double Knit and size 8 (UK) needles Cast on 8 stitches
Row 1 ( Wrong side) Slip 1, Knit 1,(Yarn fwd knit 2 tog)twice, Yarn fwd Knit 2 (9sts)
Rows 2, 4, and 6. Slip 1 Knit to the end.
Row 3. Slip 1, knit 2 (yarn fwd knit 2 tog) twice. Yarn fwd Knit 2 (10sts)
Row 5. Slip 1, knit 3 (yarn fwd knit 2 tog) twice. Yarn fwd Knit 2 (11sts)
Row 7. Slip 1, knit 4 (yarn fwd knit 2 tog)twice . Yarn fwd Knit 2 (12sts)
Row 8. Slip 1, Knit 11 sts
Row 9. Slip 1 Knit 11 sts Row 10 cast off 4 Sts Knit to the end ( 8sts) These 10 rows form the pattern. Continue in pattern until it is long enough to fit one edge, or all around, as you wish. Sew onto the blanket



Sands’ Why17? campaign: 17 babies die every day in the UK, this level of baby loss must stop!
17 babies die every day in the UK, the tragic victims of stillbirth or neonatal death, a statistic that is repeated every single day across the country.
This shocking figure, the loss of 6,500 babies every year, is something the public is not generally aware of. Most people think stillbirths don’t happen today, yet stillbirth in the UK is 10 times more common than cot death.
At Sands, stillbirth and neonatal death charity, we feel that this level of baby loss is totally unacceptable which is why we have launched the Why17? campaign to raise awareness of this devastating loss and to ask the question;
“Why are 17 babies a day dying and what can be done to halt this national tragedy?”
If you would like to know more about the Why17? campaign please go to http://www.why17.org/
 Please Help Now!
SANDS relies on donations to fund their work you can find out more information on the web site

‘Thoughtful Thursday’ Cure Caps

‘Made from the Heart to Cure the Brain’


Cure Caps. Chris Hempel founded this knitting caps charity in November of 2007 after her 5-year-old identical twins, Addi and Cassi, were diagnosed with a rare and fatal brain disease called Niemann Pick Type C. Children with this disease rarely live past the age of twenty — Chris is literally fighting for the lives of her precious children.
Unfortunately, there are 7,000 known diseases in the world. Major pharmaceutical companies only invest and perform research for 200 or 3.5% of all diseases. Research for Chris’ children is almost non-existent. She and her husband Hugh are taking on the battle single-handedly. Raising money for research is key in the battle for their children’s lives.
The vision of this knitting charity is to sell hand-knit caps and raise money for collaborative brain research that includes Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, Fragile X/Autism, and Niemann Pick Type C. 100% of the proceeds go directly for research.
Joined by their friend, Herah Osborne (the mother of twins who suffer from Fragile X/Autism), the Hempels inspire and encourage knitters to hand-knit and donate 100,000 Care Caps. And they actively search for a major sponsor to help market them.

How can knitters help?

So far, Chris and Herah have raised awareness and have received 3,000 caps, but they need many, many more. Please join this very important cause and send your caps to:
The CureCaps Project
c/o Ms. Addi & Cassi Hempel
14125 Saddlebow Drive
Reno, NV 89511
(775) 849-1924


 There is no one pattern that should be followed when making CureCaps.  They want each CureCap to be a unique.  Their tagline is, “Made from the Heart to Cure the Brain.”  and want CureCaps to be designed for kids and adults — each hat represents hope for cures for the brain.  Just send hats — all shapes, sizes, colors and styles!

 Visit Cure caps website. Be sure to watch the touching and informative videos to fully understand the mission of this special knitting charity.
Please join and help the Hempels fight for the lives of their children. If you’ve ever considered knitting for charity, now is the time! Help and donate caps, contact all the knitting charities you support and share information about Care Caps, and direct knitters you know to this blog for more information. 





Charity knitting has never been more important!

‘Thoughful Thursday’ Hugs for Homeless Animals

Hugs for Homeless Animals Gives Animals Knitted Love, Too!


The sad truth for most homeless animals is that there just isn’t enough room for all of them. While they’re usually well cared-for, they often face a short life inside a small steel cage with concrete floors. The only way out is adoption — or death.
No one wants it to be this way, least of all the people who run the shelters, but they have little choice in the matter. There are just too many strays.
That was the harsh reality faced by  Rae French in 1996, when she tried to take astray cat to the local animal shelter. After seeing the conditions in the shelter, she adopted the cat and created Hugs for Homeless Animals.
Among other things, Hugs for Homeless Animals collects Snuggles for animal shelters all over the United States. In its first year it collected more than 200,000. With Snuggles — pet blankets made to grace animal shelter pens, Hugs for Homeless Animals is out to brighten the lives of animals waiting for adoption. Snuggles are easy to make, and their recipients are always grateful.
Hugs for Homeless Animals promotes their Snuggles as the ideal project for first-time knitters, because dogs and cats don’t care about poor color combinations or dropped stitches. All they want is something comfy to lie on while they wait.
Snuggles get animals adopted, too! Something about seeing a blanket in an animal’s cage plucks at people’s heartstrings, making them more willing to open their hearts to a shelter animal.
Hugs for Homeless Animals welcomes any Snuggle you can contribute to the cause. You can find patterns, Frequently Asked Questions lists, and other relevant info at its website.
Snuggles can be knitted, crocheted, or sewn in sizes from fourteen to thirty-six inches square. If you knit or crochet your Snuggles, acrylic and cotton yarns are best, since they’re easy to machine- wash and dry.
Please don’t use wool. It collects hair, dander and dirt, making it harder to clean. It will also felt and come apart in a washing machine.
The choice of stitch is up to you, but the simple garter stitch produces a thicker, more comfortable Snuggle that’s hard to beat. One of the signature Hugs for Homeless Animals projects, the Adopt-Me Blanket, is nothing but a basic garter-stitch square, and it’s easy as pie to knit.

MUTUAL BENEFI TS
The Snuggles Project is a multi-beneficial project. It is beneficial to the animals who receive them for physical and psychological comfort. It is beneficial to the shelters who can present a more homey atmosphere and adopt more animals. It is beneficial to the Snuggle maker who receives the warm feeling that comes with doing good work to help others. Furthermore, the project is a very good project for the elderly as it gives them worthwhile work that they can do to keep them active. It is a very good project for kids and people learning how to crochet, knit or quilt because the Snuggles don’t have to be perfect. The animals love them any way they can get them. All that is required is that they be made with love.   

BECOME A MEMBER
This is a great way to support the project and get to know other Snugglers. The Snuggles Project website is a social networking website for members. They have forums, groups, newsletters, and more just with a click of the mouse.